Our BMW Radio Code Service

Our service is personal, not automated, so if you are not sure which numbers to give, provide us with all you see on the outside of the casing and we will check them for you.

 

We aim to respond by email usually within an hour, a little longer at weekends. These codes are at our standard price of £7.95, or £5.95 for our 'hard-coded' data sheets (to ensure the correct price at the checkout, order data sheets via this page).

 

After submitting the form, you will be forwarded to our payments page. Note that your request will not be actioned until payment is received. Our service is inexpensive but it is not free. We aim to give a good service to paying customers, with the assurance of our money-back guarantee: If we are not able to supply the factory-set code for your unit, we promise to refund you, less just a small 45p transaction fee.

What Customers Have Said

Bit of a challenge with a wood burner and exacto knife, and my bumbling soldering skills, but got it done and the radio works perfectly. Thanks very much for your help. (John - 1995 BMW 540i with Alpine CM5903L radio)


Thanks very much for the code. It works perfectly now. Thanks for prompt reply, will definitely be recommending you to others. (Jonathan Beer - BMW e36 328i with BMW Business RDS unit, Phillips 22DC785/24F )

Code & Radio Removal tips for BMW Radios & Sat-Navs

You will need to pull the radio from the dashboard to read the numbers we need from its chassis - this will be on a printed label, engraved on the metal case, or both. BMW radios tend to be a lot more fiddly to remove than most (where it's often just a case of using the correct extraction keys), requiring that you first remove one or more trim-plates or small plastic panels to reveal screws that need to be released.

 

And to further complicate things, there is little in common between the various models of BMW - screws are placed in different positions under different panels. You will need patience and possibly access to a variety of tools including Allen keys and Torx head screwdrivers. Removing a radio from a BMW is OK when you know how but not a job for the fainthearted novice! Just be prepared.

 

This independent website provides useful guidance on how to remove car radios and sat-nav units from vehicles.

 

Classic BMW car radios: Some older radios use soldered pins on the circuit board to physically set or 'hard-code' the BMW radio security code. These include the Alpine CM5903L, CM5907 and CM5905. Please be clear, we DO NOT offer to supply the exact unlock code for your radio. We supply information that will enable you to physically re-code the radio to a code we will give you, if you're reasonably handy with a soldering iron.

 

CAN-BUS 'Paired' Units: Note that several models, such as the Philips 22DC705, 22DC795, RCC100, RCC 102 and RCD108, are electronically paired to the original vehicle's engine management system. You cannot (easily) transfer it from one car to another.

These paired models will display "DISABLED" when installed in a vehicle other than the one to which it was originally fitted. Only re-coding specialists such as DND Services (in the UK) (www.dndservices.co.uk) will be able to help if you send the unit to them.

Order Form

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Use the form below to send us the details. You will be taken to a page where you can pay for our service using credit card or PayPal.






Not sure which is the part number etc? List them all here and we'll check them.

Our Radio Codes Service is Safe, Personal and Helps You Cut Through the Confusion

There are several Instant radio code recovery services online and that's fine if you know exactly what to do and what numbers to use. Our service is staffed by a real person who checks the details you send through, will ask if we need to know something more, and is on hand to help if you hit any issues when you go to enter the code we've supplied. And our prices are still every bit as competitive as the robot sites.

Some radios and sat-navs cannot be decoded easily, but you can waste time and money trying to find someone to do it 'quick and easy'. We'll save you the frustration by simply being honest with you, and in those situations we tell you your options rather than leave you to desperately trawl around the Internet.

The higher profile online radio decoders are generally trustworthy but that's not always the case with some others, so be wary. Also, we strongly recommend to avoid downloading free software that promises to work out your code - these little apps often carry a virus and don't do what they claim. It simply isn't worth the risk.